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2016 © Beginner Weight Loss
BEGINNER WEIGHT LOSS

The Food Combining Diet

This medically rather controversial diet has been around for decades.

It remains popular despite that fact that the principles on which it is based has not been medically validated. William Howard Hay introduced the current food combining diet to United States in 1911. His approach was based upon the understanding at the time that alkalinity is required to digest the food in the stomach. He also took the pH of food itself into account. Another supporter of the food combining diet, Herbert M. Shelton recommended eating proteins and carbohydrates at separate meals. Shelton categorized foods into three groups namely protein products, carbohydrate products and "neutral" products. Other diets based on food combining include the Beverly Hills Diet, the Fit for life diet, and Kathryn Marsden's, Leslie Kenton's Biogenic and Suzanne Sommers' diets. Not combining proteins and starches at the same meal is the foundation of this diet. Proteins are concentrated animal proteins such as meat, poultry, fish and cheese. Carbohydrates are concentrated starches such as grains, cereals, bread, potatoes, and sugars. The rest of the diet can be as simple or as complicated as you would like to make it. The Food Combining Diet is based on nine essential rules: Do not combine carbohydrates with proteins at the same meal. Eat vegetables, salads and fruits as the main part of your diet. Eat proteins, starches and fats in small quantities. Eat only whole grain and unprocessed starches. Avoid refined, processed foods such as white flour, white sugar, and margarine. Allow an interval of at least four to four and a half hours between meals of different main ingredients. Eat melons alone. Melons combine with almost no other food. Forget desserts, especially fruit. Eaten at the end of meals desserts lie heavy in the stomach, they do not digest well and ferment. Eat proteins and fats at separate meals. Some foods, especially nuts, are over 50% fat and require hours for digestion. Chew all foods thoroughly before swallowing. Abbe Spallanzani (1729 - 1799), one of the oldest observers on gastric digestion, found that grapes, when swallowed whole, even if entirely ripe, were usually passed unbroken in the stools. Howell's Textbook of Physiology (p.777) 14th ed. What does a typical day on the food combining diet look like? The Food Combining Diet Plan: Breakfast - Fruit. Any fruit in season is suitable. The amount is not restricted, but it is suggested that more than three fruits are not combined at a single meal. In the winter months, dried fruits such as figs, dates, raisins, prunes, etc., may be substituted for fresh fruit. Lunch - A large raw vegetable salad of lettuce, celery, cucumber, avocado and alfalfa sprouts or nut and seeds. Or in winter a wholesome vegetable soup (no tomatoes) with a starch, like bread. Dinner - A large raw vegetable salad, two cooked non-starchy vegetables (no potatoes) and a protein. The Food Combining Diet Theory: Digestion of Protein Proteins need an acid medium for digestion. When proteins are consumed, hydrochloric acid is produced in stomach. This activates the enzyme pepsin that digests proteins. This acid medium is neutralized by the presence of starch or sugar, and the proteins are incompletely digested. Digestion of Starch Carbohydrates need an alkaline medium for digestion. The process begins in the mouth with the enzyme ptyalin. It starts to break down the starches before they enter the small intestine where main digestion takes place. The presence of proteins or acid fruits upsets the alkaline medium necessary for the intestinal digestion of starches. Milk is best taken alone and preferably not at all. Milk is the natural food of calves. Every species produce milk adapted to the needs of its own young. The Opinion of Medical Science Many of the assumptions used to justify food combining are not supported by biological and medical science, and there is currently little evidence demonstrating weight loss success for these theories. More than one randomized controlled trial reported in the peer-reviewed medical literature, found no evidence that food-combining principles were effective in promoting weight loss. Despite the above evidence, many people insist that the food combining diet helps them lose weight, makes them feel healthier over-all and gets rid of their chronic indigestion.
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                   2016 © Beginner Weight Loss
Beginner Weight Loss

The Food

Combining Diet

This medically rather controversial diet has

been around for decades.

It remains popular despite that fact that the principles on which it is based has not been medically validated. William Howard Hay introduced the current food combining diet to United States in 1911. His approach was based upon the understanding at the time that alkalinity is required to digest the food in the stomach. He also took the pH of food itself into account. Another supporter of the food combining diet, Herbert M. Shelton recommended eating proteins and carbohydrates at separate meals. Shelton categorized foods into three groups namely protein products, carbohydrate products and "neutral" products. Other diets based on food combining include the Beverly Hills Diet, the Fit for life diet, and Kathryn Marsden's, Leslie Kenton's Biogenic and Suzanne Sommers' diets. Not combining proteins and starches at the same meal is the foundation of this diet. Proteins are concentrated animal proteins such as meat, poultry, fish and cheese. Carbohydrates are concentrated starches such as grains, cereals, bread, potatoes, and sugars. The rest of the diet can be as simple or as complicated as you would like to make it. The Food Combining Diet is based on nine essential rules: Do not combine carbohydrates with proteins at the same meal. Eat vegetables, salads and fruits as the main part of your diet. Eat proteins, starches and fats in small quantities. Eat only whole grain and unprocessed starches. Avoid refined, processed foods such as white flour, white sugar, and margarine. Allow an interval of at least four to four and a half hours between meals of different main ingredients. Eat melons alone. Melons combine with almost no other food. Forget desserts, especially fruit. Eaten at the end of meals desserts lie heavy in the stomach, they do not digest well and ferment. Eat proteins and fats at separate meals. Some foods, especially nuts, are over 50% fat and require hours for digestion. Chew all foods thoroughly before swallowing. Abbe Spallanzani (1729 - 1799), one of the oldest observers on gastric digestion, found that grapes, when swallowed whole, even if entirely ripe, were usually passed unbroken in the stools. Howell's Textbook of Physiology (p.777) 14th ed. What does a typical day on the food combining diet look like? The Food Combining Diet Plan: Breakfast - Fruit. Any fruit in season is suitable. The amount is not restricted, but it is suggested that more than three fruits are not combined at a single meal. In the winter months, dried fruits such as figs, dates, raisins, prunes, etc., may be substituted for fresh fruit. Lunch - A large raw vegetable salad of lettuce, celery, cucumber, avocado and alfalfa sprouts or nut and seeds. Or in winter a wholesome vegetable soup (no tomatoes) with a starch, like bread. Dinner - A large raw vegetable salad, two cooked non-starchy vegetables (no potatoes) and a protein. The Food Combining Diet Theory: Digestion of Protein Proteins need an acid medium for digestion. When proteins are consumed, hydrochloric acid is produced in stomach. This activates the enzyme pepsin that digests proteins. This acid medium is neutralized by the presence of starch or sugar, and the proteins are incompletely digested. Digestion of Starch Carbohydrates need an alkaline medium for digestion. The process begins in the mouth with the enzyme ptyalin. It starts to break down the starches before they enter the small intestine where main digestion takes place. The presence of proteins or acid fruits upsets the alkaline medium necessary for the intestinal digestion of starches. Milk is best taken alone and preferably not at all. Milk is the natural food of calves. Every species produce milk adapted to the needs of its own young. The Opinion of Medical Science Many of the assumptions used to justify food combining are not supported by biological and medical science, and there is currently little evidence demonstrating weight loss success for these theories. More than one randomized controlled trial reported in the peer-reviewed medical literature, found no evidence that food- combining principles were effective in promoting weight loss. Despite the above evidence, many people insist that the food combining diet helps them lose weight, makes them feel healthier over-all and gets rid of their chronic indigestion.